Tag Archives: drawing

What are we communicating with our art?

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After leaving my Interpersonal Communication class last night, I thought of the application of communication theory and the entries we receive in our art and poetry contests. One concept is that every message has a content and relationship dimension.    When we hear a message, what the words mean is the content.  What the person means and the subtext behind the words is the relationship.  Let me give you an example with the following dialogue.

Wife:               “You watch too much TV.”

Husband:         “I do not.”

Wife:               “C’mon honey….you do too.”

Husband:         “All right then, I won’t watch any TV for a whole week, dang it.”

Wife:               “Oh, just forget it.  Do what you want.”

Husband:         “Forget it!  How can I forget it?  You come in here and make a big deal out of my TV habits.  Then to satisfy you, I agree to cut it out completely and you say forget it.  What’s   wrong with you anyway?”

 

Now when the relationship is in trouble, the husband will wonder why they are unhappy as the only thing they fought about was the TV.  However, beyond the words, at the relationship level, the real message has nothing to do with the TV, but a wife who is wanting to have some attention paid to her.

So often we receive wonderful pieces of art or poetry and the content is wonderful.  However, the piece is not appropriate (from our standards) for our readers and viewers.  We are very protective of our students.  When we receive a piece of art from an obviously talented artist, but the image is of a violent or sexual nature, even though the content is good, the relationship between the artists and our student readers is such that the poem or art would be rejected. That is always a tough decision, and often we will contact the student to let them know that they have talent, but our contests are not the correct venue for them.

Maybe my connection of communication theory to our contests is a bit of a stretch.  If so, then, oh well.  However, in either case, I hope I gave you something to think about with either your relationships and why a simple argument blew up into something larger, or for our contests and why a great piece of art or poetry was not accepted to be published.

If you want to hear more about Interpersonal Communication then give us a like.  Have a great day.

Sometimes the greatest gift is believing in someone

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For Christmas, I gave my daughter the book “Do Hard Things:  A Teenage Rebellion Against Low Expectations” (http://www.therebelution.com/book).  She shared with me the book’s philosophy that often society does not expect much from our youth and that in response, youth often meet that lowered expectation.  I thought of the thousands of teachers that we work with each year with our writing and art contests.

Many times I will receive a packet of poems or view images of art that have been submitted by a teacher and my first thoughts are “Get a new teacher.”  When an entire class of high school students enter poems equivalent to “a cat sat on a bat” or enter art with crayons on lined paper, I know that it is not the students who are failing, but the teacher.  Raise the bar and students rise to meet the expectation.  When we expect little, we receive little.

My students go to a charter school that has a curriculum that is always one grade above the norm.  In 1st grade they are taught 2nd grade math and writing and this continues like this to 8th grade.  At first my reaction was that will just frustrate the student.  But I found that when expectations rise, the quality of the student rises to the expectation.  I have taught at the university level for 30 years.  During that time I have taught the same classes at the high school and middle school level.   When I say the same classes, I really mean the exact same content.  For both my university students and my 7th/ 8th grade students, I teach them difficult concepts, and in both classes they master them.
My challenge to parents and teachers is to higher your expectations.  The youth of today are capable of great achievements.  The book “Do Hard Things” is written by two teenagers.  These are kids who want the challenge.  In working with your students or even your own children, raise the bar, create a challenge and you may find it more rewarding for them and you when they “Do Hard Things”.