Tag Archives: communications

What are we communicating with our art?

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After leaving my Interpersonal Communication class last night, I thought of the application of communication theory and the entries we receive in our art and poetry contests. One concept is that every message has a content and relationship dimension.    When we hear a message, what the words mean is the content.  What the person means and the subtext behind the words is the relationship.  Let me give you an example with the following dialogue.

Wife:               “You watch too much TV.”

Husband:         “I do not.”

Wife:               “C’mon honey….you do too.”

Husband:         “All right then, I won’t watch any TV for a whole week, dang it.”

Wife:               “Oh, just forget it.  Do what you want.”

Husband:         “Forget it!  How can I forget it?  You come in here and make a big deal out of my TV habits.  Then to satisfy you, I agree to cut it out completely and you say forget it.  What’s   wrong with you anyway?”

 

Now when the relationship is in trouble, the husband will wonder why they are unhappy as the only thing they fought about was the TV.  However, beyond the words, at the relationship level, the real message has nothing to do with the TV, but a wife who is wanting to have some attention paid to her.

So often we receive wonderful pieces of art or poetry and the content is wonderful.  However, the piece is not appropriate (from our standards) for our readers and viewers.  We are very protective of our students.  When we receive a piece of art from an obviously talented artist, but the image is of a violent or sexual nature, even though the content is good, the relationship between the artists and our student readers is such that the poem or art would be rejected. That is always a tough decision, and often we will contact the student to let them know that they have talent, but our contests are not the correct venue for them.

Maybe my connection of communication theory to our contests is a bit of a stretch.  If so, then, oh well.  However, in either case, I hope I gave you something to think about with either your relationships and why a simple argument blew up into something larger, or for our contests and why a great piece of art or poetry was not accepted to be published.

If you want to hear more about Interpersonal Communication then give us a like.  Have a great day.

Art is an amazing communications tool

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You cannot not communicate. If this was an English class, the double negative would stand out a bit. But in a Speech Communication class, it is an important concept. Everything we do communicates. What you say, how you say it, what you wear. Even if you stand not moving with your arms folded and don’t say a thing. You are communicating.

I tell my students this becomes important when they go to a job interview. In the book “What the Dog Saw” by Malcolm Gladwell, an example he uses applies this concept to job interviews. A study where a group of individuals watched a short video clip of a job interview. We are talking about a very short clip. The interviewee coming in and shaking hands. Just a few seconds. When comparing the choices on who should be hired, the actual interviewers in comparison with the individuals who watched just a few seconds of the interview, the results of who should get the job was pretty much the same. In those few brief seconds, much was communicated. You cannot not communicate. Just saying your name and giving a handshake sends volumes of communication.

I liken this to what happens in our writing and art contests. So often, we are sent poetry or art where the presentation of the material is lacking. A piece of art where the concept is good, but it lacks the professionalism that separates quality art. Simple things like the paper that is used, messiness with the medium or clean lines. I mean, no matter how good the art is, when it is presented on three holed lined paper with smudges of color like something was spilled on the edges, something is lacking. You cannot not communicate. The presentation sends a message. The student did not take a national contest seriously.

In all our interactions, be aware of the messages you send. Look at the total message as you are always communicating something and we are often not aware of the message we are sending.

On an end note, enjoy the small pleasures of life. I just put my 12 year old daughter, who is in a wheelchair, to bed for the night. Her feet felt like they were frozen. But take a soft cloth bag filled with beans, 3 minutes in the microwave, and a foot warmer is a small pleasure that makes her comfortable. There are so many things that we miss when we rush through life. The smile on her face. My heart took a picture. Her smile communicated volumes.